Monday, May 2, 2022

April Reading Stats+

Here we go, another month done. So I'm not writing much but at least I'm still reading. And I actually bought a book, which is the first in a while since I've been relying on the library for most of my stuff in the last year or so. Well, bought a book for me. While we try not to buy any toys for the boy (the grandparents have that covered) I've announced that books don't count so plenty of those have come in.

Reading this month as been a bit hit or miss. But again, it's mostly library stuff so at least I'm not out dollar bucks (note, I have been watching a lot of Bluey recently, for anyone familiar. And if you aren't, you should probably check it out, whether or not you have small kids cos it is GREAT).

Anyway, let's check out some stats.

Books Read
5
One by One by Ruth Ware
Later by Stephen King
Salt Sugar Fat: How The Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
Nobody Will Tell You This But Me by Bess Kalb


One by One by Ruth Ware
I was looking through what the library had available and it recommended this new mystery by Ware. I've had mixed results with her but figured even when they're bad mysteries are at least interesting so let's give this a shot. There's a chalet up in the Alps, cut off from everyone due to an avalanche and one by one (see what she did there) people start dying. That and it's got a couple narrators and I love that. However, I didn't love this. I did love it, or at least really like it, for a while and I won't go into how things shifted because I can't get into that without spoilers but to say it was an abrupt about face with me going "Oh but I mean, they wouldn't do that...she wouldn't...cos I mean, you can't" and then angry listening to the remainder of the story going "Well...I guess she did that."
Rating before the turning point: 4 stars
Rating after the turning point: 2 stars

Later by Stephen King
It felt like I hadn't read King in a while. Though actually I read one of his books just last year. But I used to read a lot more King and then he just hasn't been top of mind for a while. Anyway, the point is, I was still scrolling through available titles from the library and this new King story came up. A young boy can see the spirts/ghosts (?) of the recently deceased and talk to them. Importantly, he can ask them questions, ones they have to answer truthfully. The story is interesting and feels very much like a King story. (Side question, has anyone, other than King, ever talked like the characters in King books talk? It is fascinating.) it also, despite being almost 250 pages, felt like it was a novella or at least the beginning of what could be a much longer story. Which I would definitely read.
Rating: 4 stars

Salt Sugar Fat: How The Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
This book sort of fell flat for me. The conceit is that processed foods have a lot of salt, sugar and fat in them and those things are bad for us and we should eat less processed foods. Which great, agreed. There's a lot of stuff the food industry does that is presented as very ominous but it's mostly "they put a lot of these things in food, even when you wouldn't think the foods have a lot of salt/sugar/fat in them". Which. Yeah. They also went into "Sometimes the businesses make it a goal to change and make foods healthier but then people buy less of the healthy versions so businesses decide to go back to the less healthy version" which again. Yeah. At one point the book does seem to claim that sometime in the '90s Kraft came up with the concept of using cheese as an ingredient in recipes instead of as something to be eaten on its own and, no sir, I do not think that is true. The parts about how unhealthy these things can be were interesting. It seems to want to make the point that there should be gov regulation on these things because businesses won't make things healthier on their own since it costs them money without actually saying that, which was too bad because it left me going "OK making a lot of good points about how people eat too much of these but falling short on what can be done"
Rating: 2.5 stars

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
What if you had the chance to undo your regrets, to take a different path in life? Nora is given this opportunity for reasons, presented as a library and she can read herself into all new lives if she had just made different choices. What if she met that guy for coffee, what if she had studied glaciers, what if she had stayed in that band with her brother, what if she kept up with swimming? There are thousands of "what ifs" and each decision, big and small, can have drastic outcomes in a life. I like the idea of the novel but there were pieces I found frustrating. For example, whenever Nora jumps into one of this new versions of her life, she's her current age with no memory of what came before it. There's a lot of bluffing her way through these different lives since she should know, say, all of the band's hit songs before she plays in front of a crowd of thousands. Maybe I just found the idea of having to do this very stressful and while it added suspense to the story, I didn't see why, per the logic of the book, how that was helpful. Especially if the idea is Nora should find a life she would rather lead. That and the fact that Nora seemed to be AMAZING at whatever she decided to do. Should she have stuck with the band? Great, she's an international rock star beloved by millions. Should she have stuck to swimming? Olympic gold medalist! And while those frustrations did drop my rating down a bit, overall I did want to keep reading, even if the ending is fairly predictable. So that's something
Rating: 3.5 stars

Nobody Will Tell You This But Me by Bess Kalb
This is a pseudo-memoir about Bess Kalb's relationship with her grandmother. Pseudo because it is based around conversations, many imaginary (as in, after her grandmother is dead) though some are taken direct from voicemails with her grandmother. Talking about her grandmother's life, and her grandmother's relationship with others in the matrilinear line (her mother, her daughter and of course, her granddaughter, Bess). The book is funny and touching, with a few pieces a bit more serious though mostly it's lighthearted and full of Jewish grandmotherly advice. And short. As an audiobook it was just about 4 hours.
Rating: 4 stars

Number of pages read
1,628

Fiction
60%

Female authors
40%

BIPOC authors
0% - not good, not good

US authors
60%

Book format
100%

Where'd I get the book
library: 80%
Indie bookstore: 20%

Bookclub/readalong
20%

Decade published
2010s: 20%
2020s: 80%

Resolution reads
40%
One by One by Ruth Ware (UK author)
The Midnight Library by Matt Haig (UK author)

Friday, April 1, 2022

March Reading Stats+

March is over, another month down. I'm always a fan of March, considering it has a few birthdays in it, including my own. Not that we did much this year, given we're still dealing with this pandemic. Which is fine, and given how many times I needed to be reminded it was my birthday, not something I was worried about. 

I thought I had done more reading this month, but I had a few starts and stops that slowed things down, though I still managed to fit in more than 1,000 pages, which is apparently a goal I have set for myself, seeing how each time I look at my tracking sheet I see how I'm doing to that goal. But why not take a look at those stats?

Number of books read
4
A Spy in the Struggle by Aya de Leon
Poirot Investigates by Agatha Christie
The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro
Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language by Amanda Montell


A Spy in the Struggle by Aya de Leon
Yolanda Vance, a driven FBI lawyer, gets sent undercover to infiltrate an "extremist" African-American group who are making trouble at a local chemical company with government ties. She isn't a field agent but she is relatively young, black and the group is operating in the town where she went to college so that's enough to make her the best agent for the job. I enjoyed much of the spy pieces and Yolanda deciding where her loyalties lie (although some of the stuff she discovers about the FBI's past seems like...yeah you should have probably known about that before, it's not exactly hidden). When the story focused on an "unexpected romance" I had more trouble staying focused. But overall, it was an engaging book and I did want to hear what would happen next.
Rating: 3.5 stars

Poirot Investigates by Agatha Christie
An early Hercule Poirot book, the third one published if Goodreads can be believed. There were several times the book swung from "Well this is just a product of its time" to "Nope, nope that's just racist" so something to consider if you're thinking of picking it up. This was a collection of short stories and I think if I was reading them vs listening I probably would have had a better time focusing. As it was, I found myself zoning out and honestly, the app I was using makes it hard to start a chapter over so most of the time I just stayed in the confusion. It's everything you'd expect from a Poirot mystery but they were shorter and Hastings seemed overall more annoyed with Poirot than I remember him being in later ones, but perhaps that was the narrator. Oh also, since I listened to this as an audiobook, one note on the narrator. Overall he did a very good job but he...he cannot do an American accent. He tries. And Americans seemed like they were in almost every story. But here's the thing. The accents were SO BAD and the American characters were only around briefly that it was honestly a delight each time I heard one. There were many different accents, all bad in different ways and never around long enough to be annoying. 
Rating: 3 stars

The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro
Have you heard of the art heist at the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum? Biggest unsolved art heist in history. Very interesting stuff, recommended. Anyway, this story is about artist Claire who makes her living making reproductions of famous works of art but can't seem to get her own art off the ground for reasons that are, honestly, sort of convoluted. But that's not the point here. The point is the reproductions she's doing are all on the up-and-up. But one day she's given something different to reproduce: one of the stole paintings from the museum. If she does this, she can get her own show at one of the top galleries in Boston. But what if this stolen Degas is also a fake? Some art history, some mystery, these are the good things. Some of the details around Claire and her history...bit less so. Overall the story probably could have done with some more editing but interesting story at the core.
Rating: 3 stars

Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language by Amanda Montell
Feminism and linguistics. I mean, what's not to love there, right? It's a funny book about the intersection of language and feminism, language and sexuality, language and gender. Each chapter is basically a stand alone piece looking at language from a particular lens, all with very nerdy humor. Definitely a quick read, one I enjoyed picking up. 
Rating: 4 stars

I also started to listen to A Killer Sundae by Abby Collette, the third in the Ice Cream Parlor cozy mystery series. I liked the first 2 books well enough and the library had an audiobook copy available of this latest one. I made it through about 2 minutes. Cos here's the thing. They've changed the narrator from the others in the series. Which could be fine, I didn't stop reading it on that fact alone. But 2 minutes in, I realized there was no way I was going to be able to listen to a whole book read this way. The pace was slow and sounded in no way like natural speech. If it was a book I was really into, I might have been able to power through (definitely listening on a faster speed), but honestly, I didn't think it was going to be worth the annoyance. Which is too bad but also reminds me the importance of narrator when choosing audiobooks. Maybe at some point I'll pick up a book (readable? non-audio? you know what I mean) version of this one

Number of pages read
1,267

Fiction
75%

Female authors
100%

BIPOC authors
25%

US authors
75%

Book format
audiobook: 100%

Where'd I get the book?
library: 100%

Bookclub/Readalong
25%

Decade published
1920s: 25%
2010s: 50%
2020s: 25%

Resolution Reads
50%
A Spy in the Struggle is by a Black author
Poirot Investigates was published before the 2000s and by a UK author

Tuesday, March 1, 2022

February Month End Stats+

Alright, another month and let's see if I can keep up with these mini-reviews along with my stats. (Spoiler,  I did!)

I don't really know what to say about this month. I will say I somehow managed to pull a muscle in my neck by just sitting at my desk working. It was so painful, and surprisingly so when I did, to the best of my knowledge nothing, that I called my mom the nurse to have her assure me I wasn't actually dying. I was doing a video call for work when I hurt myself and I very much wonder if the others on the call wondered wth was going on with me as I kept very still and tried not to grimace. So if anyone is wondering about my age, I am "pulled-my-neck-moving-my-computer-mouse-can't-move-my-neck-for-two-days" years old.


Number of books read
5
A Game of Cones by Abby Collette
Loving Day by Mat Johnson
First Bite: How We Learned to Eat by Bee Wilson
Shakespeare for Squirrels by Christopher Moore
Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrick Backman

A Game of Cones by Abby Collette
This is the second book in this cozy mystery series about Bronwyn Crewse, who returned to her small home town to run the family ice cream parlor Crewse Creamery. Except wait, there's another murder! There's a lot about the ice cream (though far less than the first book) and different shops around the village and perhaps other tropes of the cozy mystery genre which I am less familiar with. So whether this is a trope I cannot say, but one thought I repeatedly had while listening to this is that Wyn and especially her friend Maisie are basically the worst possible detectives. I'm not sure if they actually solve anything or if they just happen to be in the right place and even then, sort of have to be hit over the head with the answer. I don't necessarily know if this is a deal-breaker. I mean, it wasn't for me. This isn't my fav book but I did read both books in the series and odds are I'll read more. I mean, I'll complain again, but I'll read it.
Goodreads rating: 3 stars

Loving Day by Mat Johnson
Things aren't going great for Warren. His comic shop and his marriage in Wales have failed. He's returning back to America to deal with the death of his father, or more accurately, to deal with the crumbling mansion in the Philly ghetto. Warren himself is half black and half white, though he's spent his life identifying with the black community, despite his light skin (often having to prove himself that he was in the right space). While back in Philly he discovers a piece of his past he didn't know existed, his own daughter who has been raised as white. So that's the setting to this book, navigating a world as a mixed-race man and explaining this world to his daughter who didn't know she was mixed race. Instead there are lots of subplots that involve maybe ghosts and a cult and a love story that didn't really work for me. Things get muddled, and these less-than-stellar moments start to outweigh the good ones.
Goodreads rating: 2.5 stars (and I know you can't do half stars on GR but I am)

First Bite by Bee Wilson
Things I like: Interesting look at "children's food" vs. "food", idea that you can learn to like dif tastes whether you're a child or adult, these things aren't set in stone
Things I dislike: talks about a healthier relationship with food and not dreading eating but consistently talks about "good food" rather than just..."food. Is very judgey at the idea of adults deigning to eat "children's foods" like birthday cake ice cream
It's difficult to rate because the parts I liked, I really liked. It's just that there were an equal amount of parts that I really didn't like. And these sections kept going back and forth.
Goodreads rating: 2.5 stars which I already acknowledged I can't do on GR but I can here and the parts I didn't like annoyed me a lot so it outweighs the parts I did like (which I would rate a 4)

Shakespeare for Squirrels by Christopher Moore
Another installment of adventures of Pocket of Dog Snogging, following Fool and Serpent of Venice. This time Pocket finds himself (along with his apprentice Drool) on the shores of Athens and in the forest where there seems to be some fairy business. Pocket wanders into the world of A Midsummer Night's Dream except in this one Robin Goodfellow has been murdered and if Pocket wants to save himself and Drool he'd better figure out what's going on and fast.
If you like Moore and you like Shakespeare, this is a fun one. Not as good as Fool but it's still a good time and it was one I didn't want to put down
Goodreads rating: 4 stars

Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman
Maybe to make up for the fact that I started but decided to stop Bear Town but moreso because my library hold came in, I listened to Fredrik Backman's collection of essays to his young son about the things he needs to know. They were funny and I felt like I knew where some of his fictional characters and situations came from. it's very much in that genre of parenting books where the parents are honest about not knowing what they're doing but just trying to do their best. 
Goodreads rating: 4 stars

Number of pages read
1,437

Fiction
60%

Female authors
40%

BIPOC authors
40%

US authors
60%

Book format
audiobook: 80%
paperback: 20%

Where'd I get the book
library: 80%
indie bookstore: 20% 

Decade published
2010s: 60%
2020s: 40%

Resolution books
80%
A Game of Cones is by a Black author
Loving Day is by a mixed race author
First Bite is by an English author
Things My Son Needs to Know About the World is by a Swedish author

Tuesday, February 1, 2022

January Month End Stats+

I'm going to try something new this year for my monthly stats in an attempt to keep on top of reviews. Well not just that because I don't necessarily review out of a feeling of obligation. I want to review because while I'm reading/listening to books I have THOUGHTS and OPINIONS that I want to share, which is the whole reason to start this thing. Clearly, given priorities of the last few years, I haven't had the time to write full reviews and even my mini reviews are few and far between and by the time I get to them half my reviews are "I don't remember this. Are you sure I read this?" 

Here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to start my monthly stats post NOT at the end of the month as I usually do, but throughout the month. And I will include my mini-reviews of the books I read here. So I can jot down my thoughts about the book right after finishing them. Seems like a pretty obvious solution and I don't know why it's taken me so long to come up with, but it did and here we are. 

With that, let's take a look at those stats and mini-reviews.

Number of books read
4
The Final Girls Support Group by Grady Hendrix
Real Food/Fake Food: Why You Don't Know What You're Eating and What You Can Do About It by Larry Olmsted
Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story by Chuck Klosterman
You Can't Touch My Hair and Other Things I Still Have to Explain by Phoebe Robinson


The Final Girl Support Group by Grady Hendrix
The basic plot follows Lynette, a "final girl". You know what a final girl is, right? At the end of a slasher movie, when there's one girl left. That's the final girl. Lynette survived multiple massacres (there's always a sequel) which defined her life. She's part of a therapy support group for other final girls but it seems someone is trying to finish off these final girls.
Hendrix does a really good job of creating characters that don't fall into stereotypes and behave as one would think a real person might, when dealing with these incredible bizarre scenarios. Which in this case often means they behave in a way that is frustrating and infuriating, and if you want a character that isn't necessarily likeable but someone you still want to read about, this gives you a solid option. It's not my favorite Hendrix book (hello My Best Friend's Exorcism and The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires) but it's still a good one, though it had some pacing issues and it lacks the close female friendships that are at the center of those other two books. The plot kept me guessing, both what was coming next and what slasher movie inspired each of the girls.
Goodreads Rating: 4 stars

Real Food/Fake Food:Why You Don't Know What You're Eating and What You Can Do About It by Larry Olmsted
I like the conceit of this book, examining the food you think you're getting and what you're actually getting. Is that really parmigiano cheese or is that wood pulp? There is advice on what to look for to make sure you're getting what you're actually expecting, all of which is helpful. BUT much of the book focuses on high end items (Kobe beef, ), mostly looking at items that are supposed to only be made in one location (champagne for example). Olmsted makes the point on why something called "California champagne" is not that and how it isn't as good as the real thing but listen. If the concern is just that the quality is better with the real thing, I'm not going to get too up-in-arms about stuff listed as California champagne. And since I'm not regularly purchasing things like a $300 Kobe steak, whether that's actually Kobe beef or not doesn't really matter to me. Many of the solutions he proposes involve having to pay a lot more to get something that, yes, I'm sure is of better quality. But I'm not going to buy real balsamic vinegar if the cost is in the 3 digit range. His point that you should know what you're getting and food shouldn't be misleading is valid, but overall his level of outrage felt out of proportion to the problem discussed (except when talking about slave labor being used in imported shrimp). 
Goodreads rating: 3 stars

Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story by Chuck Klosterman
I feel I should preface this by saying I have liked Klosterman stuff in the past. I read Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs a few years after it was published and liked it. I read a few of his others as well and they didn't make a huge impact but I remember enjoying. But recently I went back to relisten to Sex, Drugs and, well, after about 10 min I decided this was no longer for me and returned it to the library. I think Klosterman's stuff might be of its time and unfortunately that time has passed and, at least for me, it didn't hold up great.
Unfortunately, this was the case with this book as well. If you were to ask me what the book is about, I'm not sure I could tell you. He goes on a road trip to visit places where rock stars died for a Spin Magazine article and spends a lot of time talking about past girlfriends. He makes some broad universal statements that fell flat for me and other observations that made me suck in air and cringe. There were some interesting moments but they were brief.
Goodreads rating: 2 stars

You Can't Tough My Hair and Other Things I Still Have To Explain by Phoebe Robinson
This is a reread and I read it so long ago I actually have a full review of it! Incredible, right? This was a Christmas gift and since my earlier copy was an ARC and also I heart physical copies of books I like so not only did I keep it but decided I wanted to reread. I maintain my comment from last review that Robinson teeters just on the edge of using a skooch too many pop culture references. But she pulls herself back just enough, and it's still very funny and tackles difficult topics (like a fellow student writing a love story where a woman decided to not escape slavery because she's in love) in an approachable way that finds the humor in the situation while still dealing with how serious some of these things are. And then there are the pieces that are just funny (not-so-guilty pleasures, love of U2).
Goodreads rating: 4 stars

Bear Town by Fredrik Backman (DNF)
You'll notice I'm writing about this book here yet it's not on my list of books I've read. Because I didn't finish this. Not because it wasn't good. It actually was pretty good. I like this author a lot. I was actually thinking about how much I liked this book right up to the point I decided I wasn't going to read it anymore. There are some spoilers here, but anyway, the story was about to involve a rape. A rape and the after effects, which were going to the remainder of the book. Something that I'm sure the author would have dealt with well, because I like the other stuff the author has done and they aren't necessarily the happiest of topics. But that doesn't mean I want to read about it. Because I don't, not really. Not now. I considered it. I talked to a friend who read it to understand what was coming and I just...reading is what I do for fun, with my limited free-time. This is just to say if that topic isn't a dealbreaker for you, this could be a good one. Or like maybe read one of his other ones first cos they are excellent.  

Number of pages read
1,235

Fiction
25% - big month for non-fiction apparently. I do find it's easier to listen to non-fiction than fiction so if I don't know what to read next, that does tend to be the way I lean

Female authors
25%

BIPOC authors
25%

US authors
100%

Book format
audiobook: 75%
paperback: 25%

Where'd I get the book
gift: 25%
library: 75%

Book club books
25%

Rereads
25%

Decade published
2000s: 25%
2010s: 505
2020s: 25%

Resolution books
25%
Just the one Phoebe Robinson one

That was pretty successful with the mini-reviews. Let's see if I can keep that up!

Thursday, January 6, 2022

My Favorite Reads of 2021

This year was a lot. Last year was a lot. Hopefully we're moving into precedented times.

But rather than dwell on what will be (something unknowable anyway) why don't we talk about reading. There was a lot of rereads this year because, you know, everything. Which means there were a lot of 5 star reviews. It wasn't all rereads but there were some new favorites from this year which is always great.

Top New (to me) Books


Broken in the Best Possible Way by Jenny Lawson
Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid
Anxious People by Fredrik Backman
You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey by Amber Ruffian
A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman
When No One is Watching by Alyssa Cole


Top Rereads

The Body: A Guide for Occupants by Bill Bryson
Superfreakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Patriots, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
World War Z by Max Brooks
The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
Andrea Vernon and the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection by Alexander C. Kane
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix
At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

Monday, January 3, 2022

2021 Year End Stats

Alright, here we go. Another year out the door. In some ways easier than 2020 and in other ways harder. And of course Omicron hitting at the end of the year right when hopes were getting up were not fun. I have some hope for next year if only because if you don't have hope, what do you have? 

I don't have much in the way of resolutions for the new year except to continue to be kind and patient with myself and with others because man, we could use more of that just in general. Maybe as a resolution take up a new hobby? That sounds like a fun one. Something I can do while watching TV so I'm spending less time randomly scrolling social media. If people have suggestions, I'm all ears. 

As was the case last year, I don't have an infographic this year. This is mostly on the assumption that I would again have to pay for things which I don't want to do right now. I mean, right now I don't even feel like looking into it to see if I even would have to pay. That's where we're at right now. But I still have my list of stats, still have a comparison to my historic averages (2013-2020) so hey, that's better that visual and easily digestable infographics, right?

Total books read
53 - There was a little bit of rushing the end of the year to hit my goal of 52 books. I had thought I was in a better place when I realized some of my tallying was counting a couple DNF books. But I did it and then some and am pretty happy about that.
Historic average: 52.6

Total pages read
17,886
Historic average: 17,568
It's interesting to see how little variation is, at least in terms of volume. Or at least interesting to me

Month with the most / fewest books read
December (6) / January, March, May (3)
Historic average: July has averaged the fewest (3) but there's no interesting numbers for most since the other months are all either 4 or 5 books

Month with the most / fewest pages read
December (2,098) / May (984)
Historic average: October (1,720) / July (1,224)

Fiction
62%
Historic average: 60%

BIPOC authors
21% - up from last year and the average but still clearly work to do
Historic average: 17%
Female authors
66%
Historic average: 56% - interesting that so far this stat has the most deviation from my normal trends. Not really sure why

Author's nationality
US: 68% (Historic average: 69%)
UK: 21% (Historic average: 20%)
Sweden: 4% (Historic average: 0.2%)
Australia: 4% (Historic average: 1.7%)
Singapore: 2% (Historic average: 1.2%)
New Zealand: 2% (Historic average: 0% - new country!)

Translation
4%
Historic average: 3%

Rereads
25% - Slightly down from last year but comfort rereads were still needed
Historic average: 20%

Bookformat
Audiobook: 94% (Historic average: 27%)
Paperback - 6% (Historic average: 31%)
I didn't pick up either ebooks or hardbacks this year. or at least I haven't finished them. That is crazy to me but honestly not too surprising given how much I've been listening to audiobooks
Where'd I get the book
Library: 74% (Historic average: 12%)
Kindle/Audible: 19% (Historic average: 42%)
Chain bookstore: 4% (Historic average: 4%)
Gift: 4% (Historic average: 10%)

Decade published
1810s: 2% (Historic average: 0.2%)
1920s: 6% (Historic average: 0.5%)
1930s: 2% (Historic average: 2%)
1940s: 6% (Historic average: 0.5%)
1960s: 2% (Historic average: 2%)
1970s: 4% (Historic average: 1.4%)
2000s: 9% (Historic average: 18%)
2010s: 38% (Historic average: 63%)
2020s: 32% (Historic average: 2%)

Top Genres
Mystery: 19% (Historic average: 5%)
Literary Fiction: 13% (Historic average: 11%)
Science: 9% (Historic average: 3%)
Humor: 8% (Historic average: 7%)
Fantasy: 8% (Historic average: 4%)

Resolution books
55%
Historic average: 47%